register

Medical

‘I was struck by the difference’: Australia’s Chief Scientist comments on the newly unveiled STEM report

Health Industry Hub | February 14, 2024 |

Minister for Industry and Science Ed Husic has unveiled the final report of the Pathway to Diversity in STEM Review. The comprehensive report, developed by the independent Diversity in STEM Review Panel, emphasises the establishment of a dedicated advisory council to drive initiatives that will usher in more women and individuals from diverse backgrounds into the STEM workforce.

The 11 detailed recommendations within the report are the culmination of 12 months of rigorous public consultation, engaging conversations, and extensive research. Minister Husic expressed gratitude to the Panel’s chair, Sally-Ann Williams, and members Mikaela Jade and Parwinder Kaur for their dedicated efforts in preparing the report.

“The reports recommend new pathways to get more women and people from diverse backgrounds into STEM careers. We need more people skilled-up to make the most of the opportunities in the growing science and technology jobs market,” stated Minister Husic.

Dr Cathy Foley, Australia’s Chief Scientist, said “I was struck by the difference between the number of men and women on permanent contracts – the survey suggests women are much more likely to be on short-term contracts. Those contracts are almost always for three years or fewer.”

She added “I want to see easier ways to move between sectors – in and out of university jobs, research institutions, government and industry. There are too many artificial barriers that discourage trained people from moving between sectors. There’s a lack of visibility, so that people think about STEM careers as university careers only, whereas the options are much wider.”

‘You can’t be what you can’t see’: Trailblazing leaders from AbbVie and Research Australia deep dive into the next generation of women in science

Acting CEO of Science & Technology Australia, Sandra Gardam, lauded the recommendations, stating, “The expert panel accepted our recommendations for a whole-of-government strategy to increase diversity and inclusion in STEM, the establishment of a dedicated advisory council, a government communications strategy to increase awareness about the importance of diversity in STEM, and acknowledged how important it is to give greater certainty to researchers through longer research grants.”

Professor Chennupati Jagadish, President of the Australian Academy of Science, urged for a more expansive and systematic approach to cultivating talent, focusing on all dimensions of diversity.

“We must now focus on a more expansive and systematic approach to cultivating talent and promoting the full inclusion of excellence across all dimensions of diversity. This includes not only women and girls, but also First Nations people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, people with disability, LGBTQIA+ people, neurodiverse people, people facing age-based discrimination and people living in regional, rural and remote areas,” he said.

The Panel, which engaged with 385 individuals and 94 organisations through conversations, interviews, and workshops, received 300 written submissions. The recommendations were also influenced by key research reports, including the STEM Career Pathways report prepared by Science and Technology Australia for the National Science and Technology Council.

The STEM Career Pathway report identifies barriers to STEM careers and proposes solutions, such as better coordination between the university and vocational sectors, improved access to work-based placements, and micro-credential training to upskill existing workers. It also emphasises engaging skilled migrants and international graduates on post-study work visas by enhancing employer understanding of overseas qualifications and graduates’ post-study work rights.

The government is now set to consider the recommendations outlined in the Pathway to Diversity in STEM Review report.

In reimagining healthcare across the entire patient journey, Health Industry HubTM is the only one-stop-hub bringing the diversity of Pharma, MedTech, Diagnostics & Biotech sectors together to inspire meaningful change.

The content on Health Industry Hub is copyright protected and should only be accessed under individual user licenses. To subscribe, please click here and visit T&Cs here.


News & Trends - Biotechnology

AusBiotech appoints new CEO: Former Sanofi corporate affairs and sustainability leader takes the helm

AusBiotech appoints new CEO: Former Sanofi corporate affairs and sustainability leader takes the helm

Health Industry Hub | April 23, 2024 |

Biotech News: AusBiotech, the nation’s leading industry body for the biotech sector, has named former leader at Sanofi, Rebekah Cassidy, […]

More


News & Trends - MedTech & Diagnostics

Federal government invests in Siemens Healthineers scanner to 'reduce wait times' for cancer diagnosis

Federal government invests in Siemens Healthineers scanner to ‘reduce wait times’ for cancer diagnosis

Health Industry Hub | April 23, 2024 |

MedTech & Diagnostics News: The Albanese Government is investing $12 million through the 2024–25 Budget, to purchase and install a […]

More


News & Trends - MedTech & Diagnostics

Cardiac device benefits face more cuts, while technical services remain secure in the short term

Cardiac device benefits face more cuts, while technical services remain secure in the short term

Health Industry Hub | April 23, 2024 |

MedTech & Diagnostics News: Starting from July 2024, Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED) listed on the Prescribed List (PL) will […]

More


News & Trends - Biotechnology

CSL's world-first gene therapy heads for MSAC assessment

CSL’s world-first gene therapy heads for MSAC evaluation

Health Industry Hub | April 23, 2024 |

Biotech News: CSL’s world-first gene therapy for haemophilia B is scheduled for consideration at the upcoming Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC) […]

More


This content is copyright protected. Please subscribe to gain access.